Unfastened meals financial institution pantries are multiplying around the Bay House, even in rich Marin

0
0
Free food bank pantries are multiplying across the Bay Area, even in wealthy Marin


Sheryl Boucher selects a tomato, a carrot, an onion, a hen breast, a can of corn, a pear and a baguette from steel tubs arrange on tables coated in red-and-white checkered tablecloths. A chum not too long ago instructed her about this meals pantry situated throughout the neighborhood room on the Hilarita Flats, low-income housing in Tiburon, the place somebody locally can fill a bag with unfastened groceries.

Meals banks are doping up in rich enclaves. Senior facilities battle subsequent to tech campuses. Why does this paradox exist? To know meals lack of confidence within the Bay House, The Chronicle spent months with the ones experiencing it every day.

It’s a shocking location for Marin County’s latest meals pantry. Thru a window, Richardson Bay flickers, and Belvedere, one of the most Bay House’s maximum unique enclaves, is not up to a mile away. The Hilarita complicated climbs up a hill, and each the structures and the landscaping round them seem in moderation tended, as though to mix into their pristine setting.

Positioned on two islands, Belvedere is a town of two,000 with a mean family revenue of $178,000. Right here, houses most sensible out at $13 million for a six-bedroom. A mile additional is a plot of land in Tiburon that not too long ago made the inside track when it went in the marketplace for $110 million.

Retired preschool director Sheryl Boucher, 72, looks at packaged salads available at the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank pantry at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Corte Madera. Photo: Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle

Retired preschool director Sheryl Boucher, 72, seems at packaged salads to be had on the San Francisco-Marin Meals Financial institution pantry at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Corte Madera.

(Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle | San Francisco Chronicle)

“On this prosperous space, you wouldn’t assume such a lot of other people would have the benefit of a program just like the meals financial institution,” says Boucher, 72, who wears lengthy necklaces over a drapey sweater. Her low voice has a relatively patrician air.

Even in one of the most wealthiest U.S. counties, her scenario isn’t distinctive. One-third of seniors in Marin County reside beneath the self-sufficiency usual of $27,000 in step with 12 months to hide elementary prices of dwelling, in line with the SF-Marin Meals Financial institution.

General, the median family revenue in Marin is greater than $100,000, and the median house price is $1.1 million.

“Like in the remainder of the rustic, there are wallet of poverty even within the wealthiest spaces,” says Edith Cadena of the SF-Marin Meals Financial institution, which gives meals to pantries within the county.

Boucher, who grew up outdoor Philadelphia because the daughter of a College of Pennsylvania professor, didn’t be expecting to finally end up on this place; actually, she used to donate to the meals financial institution. She got here to the Bay House in 1968 as a result of “issues have been taking place in San Francisco.” She opened a preschool in 1979, however after it burned down in 2006, in conjunction with her house, she hasn’t been in a position to get a educating task since. To make more money, she is a caregiver for seniors “extra aged than I.”

Boucher would no longer expose her revenue from retirement financial savings and a small social safety receive advantages, instead of to mention it’s most commonly eaten up by means of the hire on her Mill Valley cottage, which will increase once a year by means of $100 a month. She’s repeatedly discovering issues to reduce on — corresponding to a newspaper subscription — and is on ready lists for sponsored housing.

Retired preschool director Sheryl Boucher, 72, stands in line to receive food at the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank pantry at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Corte Madera. Photo: Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle

Retired preschool director Sheryl Boucher, 72, stands in line to obtain meals on the San Francisco-Marin Meals Financial institution pantry at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Corte Madera.

(Yalonda M. James / The Chronicle | San Francisco Chronicle)

The retired preschool trainer had by no means thought to be accepting unfastened groceries till August, when a chum instructed her concerning the Hilarita pantry. She now choices up groceries from the 2 within sight meals pantries each and every week, which she says has stored her masses of bucks, and is going to a unfastened lunch for Marin seniors each and every Friday.

“It’s a social factor, and development neighborhood is essential,” she says of each the lunches and meals pantry.

A chum not too long ago advised she practice for CalFresh — meals stamps. This is some other factor she by no means thought to be prior to, till issues were given tricky sufficient for her to switch her considering.

“I feel a large piece is getting over your pleasure,” she says. “I’m in dire straits right here.”


Tara Duggan is a San Francisco Chronicle workforce author. Electronic mail: [email protected] Twitter: @taraduggan




Supply hyperlink

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.